Drones Are Transforming News Media

Due to the evolution of drones and the drone cases for extra portability, the media now have a new means to approach and cover a story, providing consumers with new angles, both literally and figuratively, on the news as it’s happening. A few stories from last year highlight this trend:
The New York Times made extensive use of drones in media coverage and highlighted how the new technology made this reporting possible. A story on the impact of the Syrian Civil War on Aleppo captured using drone footage was featured on the front page, and, realizing the impact drones had on coverage, the newspaper put together a list of top stories it told through drone footage across the world.
CNN launched a team dedicated to flying and operating drones as part of expanded news coverage. The news network used drones as a way of augmenting its traditional television coverage, providing the benefits of traditional aerial vehicles such as planes and helicopters, and the improved vantage point they can provide, but for a fraction of the cost.
Drones were also the cause of governmental action, with police and local authorities imposing no-fly zones to forestall the possibility of media coverage using drones. During civil unrest in 2014 in Ferguson, MI, police requested that airspace be closed off to prevent media from gathering footage. Similarly, authorities instituted no-fly zones in the vicinity of protests at Standing Rock, ND, which protestors and journalists claimed were to prevent coverage of the protests and the acts of police.
Using drones is already transforming the media, and that will only increase as drones become more widespread and technically able. As authorities are forced to create regulations that permit more widespread use of drones, this trend will only increase moving forward. Drones are not just toys, but enterprise tools as well as part of a new wave in media.
Drones turned the corner in 2015 to become a popular consumer device, while a framework for regulation that legitimizes drones in the US began to take shape. Technological and regulatory barriers still exist to further drone adoption.
Drone manufacturers and software providers are quickly developing technologies like geofencing and collision avoidance that will make flying drones safer. The accelerating pace of drone adoption is also pushing governments to create new regulations that balance safety and innovation.
Safer technology and better regulation will open new applications for drones in the commercial sector, including drone delivery programs like Amazon’s Prime Air and Google’s Project Wing initiatives.
BI Intelligence, Business Insider’s premium research service, has compiled a detailed drone report that forecasts sales revenues for consumer, enterprise, and military drones. It also projects the growth of drone shipments for consumers and enterprises.
The report details several of world’s major drone suppliers and examines trends in drone adoption among several leading industries. Finally, it examines the regulatory landscape in several markets and explains how technologies like obstacle avoidance and drone-to-drone communications will impact drone adoption.